The Department of Biology provides training for both undergraduate and graduate students. The strongest areas of training in the program are in Animal Behavior, Cell and Developmental Biology, Computational Biology, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Genetics, Molecular Biology, Neurobiology, Physiology, and Plant Biotechnology.  In addition, the Department is closely affiliated with other divisions such as the School of Medicine and the Case School of Engineering at Case Western Reserve University.  Cooperative programs outside of Case, including the Cleveland Museum of Natural History, Cleveland Metroparks Zoo, and the Holden Arboretum allow for students to have a variety of resources at hand.  Research in the department is primarily conducted in one of three focus areas: Cell and Developmental Biology, Neurobiology and Neuromechanical Systems, or Evolution and Ecology.  This focus framework allows faculty to build on common research interests. Mentored teaching and research programs with faculty and students foster a strong educational environment in the Department.

Get to know the BioScience Alliance in 20 minutes

Members of the BioScience Alliance (CWRU Biology, Holden Forests & Gardens, the Cleveland Museum of Natural History, and Cleveland Metroparks Zoo) recently highlighted their research in a virtual poster session as part of this year's Graduate Research Symposium.  View the full session here: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1VdhrhAxCJsPUyHOAmp7eOD5ZFbowbB_e/view?usp=sharing

New Course for Summer 2021: Pandemics, Past and Present: Integrative Approaches (BIOL/HSTY 277)

Drs. Dianne Kube and Leena Chakravarty, along with colleagues in History, talk about their new course in the following video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f7ZGXvHpEB0

Dr. Sarah Diamond to lead special report on climate change policy

Sarah Diamond, associate professor in the Department of Biology, is a section lead on a special report coming out of a brand new collaboration between the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES). The goal of the report is...

Dr. Jessica Fox featured on NPR’s “All Things Considered.”

Why is it so hard to swat a fly? Scientists say they found that halteres — dumbbell-shaped evolutionary remnants of wings — are the reason why houseflies can takeoff quickly from any surface. You can listen and read a transcript here!